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Finding your underwater vision

 My Animal Planet / Documentary Project - a portrait of an Australian Fur Seal through glass. Sydney Aquarium, 2009

My Animal Planet / Documentary Project - a portrait of an Australian Fur Seal through glass. Sydney Aquarium, 2009

Some of my earliest underwater memories come from observing nature in an aquarium where I used to work while I was studying photography. I began experimenting by photographing the creatures through the glass, waiting for the right moment as a seal or a little penguin would zoom past. These moments were crucial learning curves for me as it was not until many years later when I got to share the ocean with them too.

 First photograph of a turtle / Hamilton Island 2012

First photograph of a turtle / Hamilton Island 2012

 Australian Fur Seals, Narooma, Australia 2014

Australian Fur Seals, Narooma, Australia 2014

 

While I was discovering the underwater world I was learning about light and explored what I was naturally drawn to. It was through these explorations that I found my visual language and developed as a photographer.  I was drawn to quiet moments in this world.

"Stillness" Australia 2013

 I may not get to visit the ocean as often as I would like, but I still try and practice every day. I watch as the light shifts and changes, I take pictures on whatever tool I have available from a phone or my favourite point and shoot camera. And when I do get a chance to go into the ocean, the camera comes with me and it becomes an extension of my practice. It is thanks to these continued learnings that I am able to enter new environments and feel comfortable with my approach while creating a unique collaboration between myself and the environment.

A selection of images from my personal project "Bloom". Byron Bay, Australia 2017

There is always something new to learn. It took me years of explorations and feedback to gain the confidence to connect to my work the way that I do today and I am still learning. That is the beautiful thing about photography it is ever changing, just like nature. There is no limit to your skill set and you will continue to grow.

 Australian Sea Lion , Olympus Australia South Australia 2018

Australian Sea Lion , Olympus Australia South Australia 2018

Many moons ago I was also fortunate to share my work with like-minded individuals, it was a safe space for me to experiment and grow. This group was absolutely essential to my development as a photographer. These connections changed my life and the way I express myself through my work. Our beautiful community exists to this day. This is why I see such incredible value in supportive communities such as National Geographic Your Shot where a global audience of 195 countries come together and shares the way they see. It has been such an incredibly rewarding experience for me to curate the National Geographic Your Shot assignment Underwater Beauty. I hope you too keep on exploring and enriching the world with the beauty that you see.